Hinsdale 86 Attendance Controversy Continues

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When we last left Hinsdale Township High School District 86, home to Hinsdale South and Central High Schools, the school board had voted (4-3, barely) to scrap plans for a referendum this November to seek many millions in new tax revenues (estimates ranged from the mid-70s to the low 90s, but it varied from meeting to meeting and from board member to board member).  At the time, we suggested that this would only lead to more unrest—the decision to cancel the referendum vote came after loud protests from South residents who felt seeking new money for building additions at Central (where increasing enrollment has led to overcrowded facilities) was exercising poor fiduciary judgement when South had room for at least 350 students. (This year’s attendance numbers show 2840 students in Central and 1570 at South, a gap of 1270.).  “Fill South First” became their rallying cry, and the board acquiesced, at least on the referendum proposal, which they tabled.  Then, residents who lived in the buffer zone came out in droves to lobby the board not to touch the area in the middle of the district where parents can choose which of the two schools their children attend; the majority of whom have selected Central over the years.  Another meeting or two and the board decided it would not form an attendance advisory committee to look at the issue as well as tabling all discussions of any attendance boundary changes, instead preferring to address the problem as a full board updating the 2008 Strategic Plan.  And during the discussions about this vote, the five board members present all declared that they were voting this way with the understanding that nothing would be done to eliminate or modify the buffer zone, which had been expanded in June.

Finally, and most recently, the board has been discussing the possibility of an April referendum for a smaller, proportionately distributed increase, mainly to solve the Central overcrowding issue.  (No one has been all that specific about what needs to be done at South, which was why the original referendum was skewed so significantly toward Central projects.)  Again, amounts have been fluid, but now the range seems to have shrunk to up to $40,000,000 or less than $60,000,000.  There has also been talk at a couple of school board meetings about creating an “international baccalaureate program,” a sort of school-within-a-school of advanced studies which would be housed in South and be able to “attract” students from the Central attendance area.

So, what does it all mean?  First, and quite clearly, it indicates a board trying to please all of its constituents, but ultimately recognizing that the Central attendance area’s size and influence will prevent the most logical and cheapest solution—changing boundaries so students originally slated to attend Central or allowed to choose between the schools would now be required to go to South—from even being considered, much less taking place.  Several people, including board members, have stated the buffer zone where families have a choice of schools is a bad idea, that it never should have been created in the first place.  Yet, since it exists and the board will not antagonize its proponents by discussing any changes, it appears to be a permanent facet of District 86.  And that also means that ALL current borders are inviolate and not subject to any modification—except, of course, when people seek an expansion of the buffer zone so those previously in the South area can now pick Central, which happened just a couple of months ago.

Therefore, the concept of altering school boundaries for the best allocation of resources and the least amount of building additions for short-term attendance fluctuations—as is the practice in some school districts (see this and this  for two local instances)—is not going to be discussed, debated, or considered beyond the recent South parent outburst which never got beyond citizens reading prepared statements at board meetings.  To give you an example of how different it can be other places, a colleague of mine lived a block away from an elementary school where he planned to send his daughter.  Attendance growth spiked in other areas, however, and the new boundary for his nearby school was modified so that it ended on the other side of his colleague’s street; his daughter wound up being bussed over two miles away.  And this took place between school years, with little notification.  An extreme example, perhaps, but that’s appropriate in comparison to the extreme opposite that is starving South of students while revenues are raised to add on to Central.

And as we pointed out previously, the key problem is how poorly South is perceived by those in the Central attendance area.  Why else would people be so aghast about the prospect of having to go there?  Even the “international baccalaureate program” seems insulting to South:  The only way that Central students could ever be enticed to enroll in South would be to create an honors school; one that has as little as possible to do with those currently there.  You don’t have to stretch your imagination too far to see this school-within-a-school having a different name, parking lot, entrance, mascot, cafeteria, and even extra-curricular activities so that its students wouldn’t ever have to interact with “those” South people. You should know that I worked in District 86 at South for twenty-five years, often in leadership positions in my role as teacher union president and contract negotiator, not to mention teaching English honors classes, and not once did the international baccalaureate idea come up.  The only reason it’s arisen now, I believe, is because the board is desperately seeking a way to make both sides of town happy.  I’m pretty sure, though, South siders will see through a plan based on selling a separate-but-not-equal plan to Central residents (as well as the few South kids who qualify) to isolate them from the rest of the “ordinary” kids already in the school.

But I’d bet even a separate honors school wouldn’t be enough to get three or four hundred Central kids to transfer to South voluntarily.  Plus, the logistics—specific applications and curriculum requirements have to be accepted by the licensing organization before a program can be labeled “international baccalaureate” which could entail years of planning and preparation—mean that it’s implementation is a ways off.  So the April referendum proposal is much more likely to be the key solution to Central’s space issues; bids could be put out for additions to be completed in time for the 2017-18 school year.  And there would be some remodeling and updating at South, probably using what could soon become standard operating procedure in District 86—proportional funding.  With 64% of District 86 students now going to Central, according to the Chicago Tribune, “The board members said the spending in any new plan for facility improvements should be allocated between the two schools in a ratio that reflects their enrollment.”  Does that mean District 86’s overriding policy of past years—“Whatever it takes to meet the needs of students”—will now mutate to a “$0.64 of every tax dollar needs to be budgeted for Central” approach?

Look, I understand how difficult this situation is for everyone:  South people have felt overshadowed and overlooked for decades; Central residents (and buffer zone folks) believe the district has promised them the right to attend Central regardless of their opinions of South; and school board members are caught right in the middle between competing interests and conflicts that began many years ago.  But this vacillating back and forth as they have will do nothing but exacerbate the problems, leaving everyone dissatisfied and angry.  One board member even apologized to the buffer zone audience for creating undue “anxiety” with the board’s even mentioning changes.  So having to think about maybe attending Hinsdale South has now become a stress disorder?  The property value issue is another “factoid” seemingly designed to irk people who live in Darien (which has always been advertised as “A Nice Place to Live,” by the way).  Homeowners’ beliefs that the selling price of their homes would plummet if South were their high school really should not be something a school board considers, much less endorses, but much of what has occurred at recent board meetings has indicated exactly that: The school board understands one of its two high schools is perceived as inferior by members of its communities, and it is not going to anything to alter that perception.  In fact, through several of its actions, it has implied that it agrees with that assessment.

I suppose it wouldn’t be so bad if there were evidence to support that belief, besides test scores.  On safety, opportunity, rigor, course offerings, quality of teaching, facilities, and on and on; South is every bit as good as Central.  If anything, due to the size differential, there are many MORE opportunities at South for extra-curricular activities and sports teams.  Yes, there are differences as we’ve noted before, but none of them make Central quantitatively better for any student than South.  The entering freshmen at Central have higher academic scores than those who go to South which accounts for differences on later achievement tests, but that has nothing to do with how far any one kid can go at either school.  However, nobody is pointing this out except this ex-South teacher, who can easily be dismissed as biased.  I would argue, however, that boosting the schools is a school board’s job as well.  This board’s actions, I regret to point out, have not sent that message clearly, certainly not clearly enough.

It remains to be seen how the perception problem will ever go away, unless it is confronted directly, but at least this board is not taking the route past boards have with building projects—using surplus tax collections and issuing bonds rather than polling residents.  Instead, it understands the intent of property tax laws and is seeking permission, through a referendum, to increase those taxes.  The District 86 communities, then, will have the final say on whether to preserve the current dichotomy by spending more money to make Central bigger so that no one outside of South’s current attendance area has to go to South.  And if voters reject increased taxes and the referendum…well, that would definitely put everyone in a more interesting and challenging position:  What would be done to change the perceptions (which are either grossly exaggerated or false) that South is much worse than Central and that property values would crater in areas switched from Central to South?  Would the board revert to old tricks by “finding” other ways to get the funds for a Central expansion?  Either way, it looks like the April election—which will also feature four District 86 board positions on the ballot—should be quite interesting.  I’m pretty sure we have not heard the last of the Attendance Wars in Hinsdale Township High School District 86.

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2 comments

  1. Pingback: Hinsdale 86 Voters Pick the Hard Way |
  2. Pingback: Referendums Should Be for Teachers, Too |

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