Trumped III: Gearing Up

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Okay, the next President will be Donald Trump.  No, I haven’t come any closer to liking that fact than when I wrote about why it happened or his approach to the Presidency in my last two essays.  It is some solace, although more tragic and ironic than satisfying and useful, to know that more Americans actually voted for Hillary, the fifth time in our history the popular vote winner has lost the Presidency.  But no matter what mental machinations we try to fool ourselves with, come January 20, the 45th President of the United States will be Trump.  So what’s somebody who opposes almost all of what Trump stands for, has proposed, and will endeavor to enact supposed to do?

First and foremost, I would suggest that we anti-Trumpers stop with the meaningless rhetoric.  The two extremes are, “We all need to come together and give him a chance/fresh start,” contrasted with, “He’s not my President!”  I can understand the thought processes behind both these pronouncements, but they do nothing but illustrate how little we care about how our representative democracy works in the first case or show the same petulant whining we so often chastised Donald for during the campaign, not to mention those who weren’t happy with President Obama for the past eight years, in the second.  Our electoral process has determined that Trump will be President; “giving him a chance” is simply a rationalization for withdrawing from the fray: “Hey, I don’t know what he’s doing, but I’m giving him the benefit of the doubt for now.”  Sorry to tell you, but you don’t have the power or influence to determine whether or not the President, duly elected by our system, gets to take over.  It’s nice of you to grant Trump your official permission, but whether or not you do makes absolutely no difference—sadly, he gets a chance no matter what.  And no, it’s not okay for you to sit by while he dismantles any progress we’ve made in the country over the past fifty years because it was easier to wash your hands of the whole thing rather than get involved to oppose the bad things he will push for.

Nor does acting like a child help the situation.  “He’s not my President” is another mind game designed to separate people from any issues that arise during Trump’s reign.  Yeah, it’s embarrassing as hell to have this guy as President, but denying Trump as “yours” (even if limited to an internal denial) does nothing to change what’s happening.  Just because I’m a die-hard White Sox fan and do not care for the Cubs won’t make my “The Cubs are not my World Series champions” statement any less ridiculous.  Not only does it achieve nothing except the same satisfaction toddlers get from pitching a fit, but it hardens those who voted for him, making it more difficult to get them to abandon Donald quickly once they see how he will operate.  Deal with reality, please, not knee-jerk negativity.  Unless you can state, “Donald Trump is President of the United States,” you won’t be able to move to the next phase of dealing with him.  By all means, drop the possessive, personal, obsessive “my” from your description of ANY national figure.  If you like the person in question, the most reasonable and positive term would be “our” (as in “Our Obama”).  And if you don’t, “the” will do just fine.  But accept it—he won, and denying that or insisting that you are somehow divorced from that reality only serves as a rallying point for his supporters who will have a point in claiming you sound like a crybaby.  If all our accolades to Michelle Obama’s, “When they go low, we go high,” had any sincerity at all, we should avoid any reliance on the “But they did it too!” plaint as justification for mocking everything he does.  Donald Trump will be the next Commander in Chief.  (Yes, I was testing you by using the most grandiose term for President possible because we all know Donald eats up that kind of stuff, and you have to maintain your cool despite the awfulness of having a President who will probably be mostly in love with the pomp and circumstance which will surround him, while the snakes he brings on board have a field day repealing anything demonstrating fundamental fairness and/or humanity at the same time they’re striving to add to the riches those already ridiculously wealthy, all in the name of the only “true” faith, Christianity.  Yeah, this is going to be a long four years.)

But that in no way implies that we should passively accept this future for America.  Actually, the chief problem with both of the above utterances is that they play right into the hands of those who are happy to work with Trump and plan to take as much advantage of his term as possible.  We can, should, and must oppose any and all parts of his initiatives that allow intolerance, reduce fundamental rights, increase world tension, and perpetuate unfair distribution of wealth.  The “give him a chance” folks need to be reminded that this is the man who in announcing his candidacy characterized Mexicans as rapists, and then went on to encourage people to shoot Hillary Clinton, bragged about sexually assaulting women, retweeted Klan propaganda, and proposed banning all Muslims from entering the country.  His “make America great again” agenda includes building a ridiculous wall, repealing gay rights, outlawing abortions, restricting minority voter access, and enriching his billionaire class.  I was through giving him chances after the attack on Mexicans, personally, but even if you hung around longer than that, he’s had plenty of opportunities to veer away from hatred, sexism, and greed.  He’s not going to, and even if by some miracle he some day will, it would be extremely dumb to assume he’s changed until he’s proved it for a long, long time, at the very least.

Many of his supporters will realize soon enough that they voted against their own interests with Trump, but that isn’t any reason for the rest of us to gloat, regardless of the level of gloating they are engaging in right now.  It will be tough enough for them to accept what we’ve always known:  We’re all screwed with this guy as President.  We need to welcome, galvanize, and organize anyone who understands the dangers of this man and the deplorables he is bringing into our government, no matter how late they come to that understanding.  Yes, Hillary was wrong to characterize half his supporters with that word, but we can never accept the bigotry, racism, and religious intolerance that many of his appointees and advisors have historically espoused.  Bannon and his ilk must be faced down each and every time they try to attack women, Muslims, blacks, gays, Jews, and the press.  Liberals’ nice speeches and essays (like this one, I’ll be the first to admit) might make us feel better and allow us our smug superiority, but holding a protest or two and snorting indignantly won’t mean a damn thing unless we follow that up with action, because the stakes are pretty high.

Voter repression, wasteful spending on ill-conceived projects, tax-breaks for the 1%, repeals of reproductive and minority rights, and huge increases in military spending are just a few of the significant areas that Trump has proposed.  And that’s where the real work begins—without voter interest and participation, the Republican President, Congress, and (very soon) Supreme Court majorities will work together to enact substantial changes to much of the progress which has been so painstakingly achieved in our lifetimes.  It is small comfort right now that history has always arced toward progress when it comes to social issues, at least.  During my time on this Earth (I was born in 1957), there have been laws in this country making it illegal for a white to marry a black  and denying any rights (legal or sexual, if you can imagine) for gay couples.  Yes, it seems absurd that we allowed the government to discriminate to that degree, just as future generations will be amazed that a U.S. President could be in favor of much advertised to be in Trump’s first 100-day plan.  History will show how wrong many of the Republican goals are, and eventually, right will triumph and become the norm.

In the meantime, though, we’ll have to do what we can to resist rollbacks in areas crucial to everybody, like climate change.  No, I’m not optimistic Donald will be able to prove it’s a Chinese hoax, but we can expect many regulations loosened or repealed which will lead to more damaging fuel usage, especially coal, in the near future.  The Keystone Pipeline might come barreling through from Canada.  Drilling will be permitted in more national parks than before.  Climate clean-up pacts made with most of the developed world might be torn up.  Clean air and water regulations could be diluted, as could restraints on fracking.  All of these things will affect everybody in both the short and the long term; it is in all our best interests to provide input to our legislators to help them understand that there is no future in pollution, and burning carbon produces pollution. (In addition, we should contribute when we can to non-profit groups dedicated to fighting for the climate.)  Unfortunately, Mother Nature couldn’t care less who’s in office, and the significant, negative weather changes many parts of the country have already begun to experience will only spread, not to mention more frequent, more severe storms à la Katrina and Sandy will slap us hard upside the head.  Making these disasters even worse, lower income groups will be disproportionately hurt by these events.  Trump is totally wrong on his approach to the environment.

And that’s just one issue of dozens that will begin to impact people, especially those lacking high wages as a shield to the outcomes of a Trump Presidency.  When that disillusion sets in for those who reluctantly voted for Trump in the belief that he was the lesser of two evils, those poor souls need to be welcomed with ideas and leaders who can explain clearly how their programs will benefit everybody.  There is very little in Trump’s stated plans which will help many working people.  Sure, he’ll be able to pressure some business moguls not to move the occasional factory, but he’ll also foster laws which weaken collective bargaining and anything else which help unions organize or negotiate on behalf of employees effectively.  That union people actually voted for Trump boggles my mind, but somehow many were convinced that he has answers.  When that facade is swept away, the Democrats need to be up-beat and concrete with ways to combat Trump’s direction.  We need for them to get their acts together quickly to unite in ways that will offer shelter to those battered by the Trumpocalypse.  Whether it be Bernie, Elizabeth, or rising stars like Corey Booker and Julián Castro; it’s important for disappointed people to have something besides a smug, “I told ya so,” to turn to post-Trump.  (Speaking of Corey and Julián, anybody besides me think we might have had a different election outcome had Hillary picked someone for Vice President with a bit more pizazz than Tim?)

And so it’s vital to do battle with the Trumpians.  But given the number of different areas for which Trump and his Republican legislators/judges have plans to repeal any recent progress and to revert to that which is more oppressive, unhealthier, and more monetarily unfair; you’ll have to limit your focus.  Time and money are extremely valuable resources, and for us middle-class people, there’s only so much of either that we have to give.  Any help you can give to combat poor choices which are proposed under Trump (including issues such as race relations, economic inequity, voting rights, tax codes, climate change, pollution, education, religious freedom, LGBT rights, international relations, veterans services, deficit spending, defense department increases, renewable energy, Supreme Court nominees, and the next hundred or so things you could list) would be a hugely positive step—the magnitude of all those things will cause most to abandon the quest before even trying, but we will all be impacted by the decisions, de-funding, laws, and wars these people try to push through.  Steve Bannon is his senior advisor; that sentence alone should motivate every one of us.  So find a cause that interests/motivates you, and at least give money to its champions.  I understand—we’re bombarded with requests for our money and time constantly, so I won’t belabor that which is likely to alienate my audience—just give it some thought, okay? Instead, I’ll cut to the real chase and get to the one thing that absolutely has to change in order to repel that which is Trump as quickly as possible.

Any discussion of working to oppose what Trump wants to impose has to begin and end with voting.  And in our instant-information (not particularly accurate or well-researched information, but, hey, at least we can get the biased nonsense fast, right?), there has to be some way for social media to exert more pressure on those who do not vote.  Again, it might take some time for many to understand how foolish it was to accept the false equivalency propaganda which portrayed this election as a choice between two poor candidates and allowed the experienced, qualified, knowledgeable person to be defeated by the new, unqualified, ignorant guy.  Sadder still, is the extent to which many allowed themselves to buy the-two-equally-bad-candidates garbage to the point of not voting at all.  Even a meager amount of effort would have convinced those fence sitters that like her or not, Hillary was the demonstrably, significantly, unquestionably better choice; and that regardless of what the polls predicted, a millionth of a percentage chance that some idiotic FBI investigation of Anthony Weiner’s computer might open the door to the remotest possibility of Trump’s winning was risk enough to make sure to vote for Clinton.  But almost half of eligible voters did not cast a ballot.  That’s probably the most awful part about this whole thing—just how easily we could be preparing for an historic first woman’s inauguration as President instead of stocking up on doomsday supplies or checking into the process on becoming a Canadian citizen.  All it would have taken would have been for some of us to have voted in a few key states—Wisconsin, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Florida, and North Carolina all could have been won by Hillary if more had turned out.  And had the results in those states have changed; Hillary would have won the Electoral College 312-226.   Everybody needs to vote, and we need to put pressure and lay more guilt on those who don’t.

And that could be a great public service project to get involved in.  Voter ID, false reports of election fraud, and other attempts to suppress opposition voters need to be stamped out.  We should make voting easier, not harder, with a national holiday for elections, on-line voting becoming common-place, and automatic voter registration—based on driver’s licenses and the like.  The anti-Republican tide is swelling in this country, and it’s just a matter of time before the outdated, tinged with racism policies this party advocates are yesterday’s horror.  Who knows?  As a union activist in my teachers association for thirty years, I learned that one of the most galvanizing factors to increase member participation (which, like voter participation, is also hard to generate) was a terrible school board member or three to roil the waters.  In the case of Donald, we’ve got perhaps the greatest motivator for progressive programs ever.  I know it’s hard to imagine right now, but one day, we might even see Donald Trump’s election as President as the single biggest cause of a renaissance in human development, not because of the idiotic agenda Donald is advancing, but because of how many people were disgusted by his plans and joined together to defeat him.  Now is not the time for despair or withdrawal.  Trump will soon be the President, so we’d better get busy.

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  1. Pingback: The Next Education Secretary |

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